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Mt. Hood Sunrises

The Daily Prompt: Dawn

This is the final post in a three part series I’m now officially calling the 2012 Sunrise from Rocky Butte in Portland, OR series. If there’s demand I may just post some more images from this series since there are still over 60 quality images from this series of 110 images. I hope you’ve enjoy viewing these images as much as I’ve enjoyed creating them. Please feel free to share these posts with your friends and family.

If you haven’t been anxiously following this series of posts, you can still see the previous two posts from the main page of my blog, just scroll down. The first post focused on Abstract Sunrise images, while the second post featured images of Mt. St. Helens in Southern Washington. In case you haven’t noticed it yet, this post features images of Mt. Hood, the highest peak in Oregon, located approximately 50 miles East of Portland, OR and Rocky Butte.

Mt. Hood is considered the Strato-Volcano and while official listed as a dormant volcano, it’s largely considered to be eligible for eruption within the next 30 years, though an explosive eruption, like what happened to Mt. St. Helens in 1981, is unlikely. It’s believed that Mt. Hood erupts approximately every 300 years, and it’s thought that the last major eruptive period occurred sometime in the late 1700’s. When Lewis & Clark first explored this region in the early 1800’s they originally named the Sandy River the Quicksand River because it was still predominantly clogged with mud and debris from this late 1700 eruption. The Sandy river drains Mt. Hood to the West and flows into the mighty Columbia River just East of Portland.

Mt. Hood got it’s current name in 1792 by Lt. William Broughton of Capt. George Vancouver’s exploratory exhibition. Broughton named the mountain after British Admiral Samuel Hood. However, before Europeans and Eastern Americans began traveling in this area, the local natives called the prominent mountain Wy’East. It’s featured prominently in several native tales that include a three way love affair between Mt. Hood, Mt. St. Helens, and Mt. Adams (also located in Southern Washington almost directly across the Columbia River from Hood River). For more about this fascinating tale and more about the original Bridge of the Goods myth, check out the story on Wikipedia.

Finally, Mt. Hood is home to 12 major glaciers or snow fields. For more information regarding this fascinating mountain be sure to check it out on Wikipedia.

To purchase prints of these beautiful images, visit my ViewBug Portfolio – Emerald Studio on ViewBug.com

Be sure to visit me on Facebook also – Emerald Studio on Facebook.

Peace

~V

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