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Posts tagged “Wild

Three Moods of the Trillium Flower


Trillium flowers are blooming. This poor flower is almost extinct in some places. It’s so beautiful people can’t resist the temptation to pick it and take it home.

First off, it won’t last! Second, Don’t! In some places it’s illegal!

But, if you pick this flower it won’t get the opportunity to collect it’s all important energy that enables it bloom next year. This flower depends on it’s above ground parts to collect the energy from the Sun and send it down to the root underground for storage. The longer it has the opportunity to do that the more energy it has forĀ  continued blooms. So, take pictures all you want, but leave it where you find it. Don’t fulfill that temptation.

Peace

~V

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Clackamas River


Okay, so I was supposed to post this series of images last Summer, soon after I posted my Washougal River post from last year. But I got sidetracked and to be honest I didn’t think these images that I found out on the Clackamas River weren’t as spectacular? But I’ve decided to post anyway, since I haven’t posted at all this month, I wanted to get something out there.

The Clackamas River feeds into the Willamette River in Oregon City, after traversing out of the Cascade foothills Southeast of Portland, OR. It’s a beautiful river, but was probably once even more grand before Portland General Electric came in and built dams to provide power to the growing city to the North. The valley hasn’t been logged very much recently as compared to along Highway 26 out to the coast. It was logged long ago, and the second growth forest is coming in nicely. Hopefully they won’t log again for a long time to come.

I also wanted to say that I updated my last Feature Artist post featuring some commentary about the pieces I posted images of from the artist himself, Jan Shield. Check out the link and some great fine art.

Peace

~V


Winter Waterfalls


The Wilson River cuts a path through the Coast Range Mountains, and the Tillamook Bay, toward the Pacific Ocean in Northern Oregon. This beautiful river is largely protected having been established as part of the Tillamook State Forest. Wilson River is one of five rivers that drain the Tillamook Valley on the Oregon Coast. Oregon State Highway 6 runs along side most of the Wilson River as you’re moving from Portland to Tillamook. There are many pull outs along the way for creating some pretty amazing photos. I was fortunate to traverse that path a couple times about a month ago. As you can tell from the images, I was just a little too late to catch the Autumn Color Transition. Still some pretty amazing waterfall images to enjoy of this the first day of Winter, 2014.

Happy Holidays, enjoy, and peace

~V


Fishing Platforms on the Deschutes River


Sherars Falls along the Deschutes River in Northern Central Oregon, just a few miles before it drains into the Mighty Columbia River. Named after Joseph Sherar, who owned, and invested in, the bridge nearby during the late 1800’s. Sherars Falls has always been a popular crossing spot over the Deschutes River. It’s also been a favorite fishing spot among regional natives for a long time before that. The platforms they build along the river allow access to fishing so they may provide sustenance to their families, along with entertainment for passersby by providing demonstrations for all to see. Sherars Falls is not as nice as the infamous Celilo Falls, which is now buried under a reservoir in the Columbia River behind The Dalles Dam, but decent none-the-less. Here are some images I found a couple years back while on a visit to White River Falls. It was a sunny day, and fortunately our visit was timed decent enough to get a different play of the blaring sun shining down on the river.

Thanks for stopping by this week, I hope to keep providing these images for your enjoyment. While the number of followers appears to be growing, I’m not getting the number of visits to my blog as I’d like at this point in my blog’s history. This is causing me to believe that I’m not doing a good job here, either my images aren’t that great or, the layout is not appealing? Not sure what it is? If you have some construction feedback to provide, please do so in the comments area. I do appreciate all the likes I’m getting to my posts, but unfortunately, the number of visitors to my blog has dropped. While I do a lot of my posting for my own pleasure and if someone else finds something here they enjoy, that’s awesome. It does help keep the motivation going when I see people enjoying my blog and spending time looking at these images. I do appreciate what I’ve gotten, however, I’ll probably have to drop back the number of posts I do every week? Since it appears the interest isn’t present?

Peace

~V


Oregon Ducks!


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Also known as the Mallard, this is the Wild Duck equivalent to the Domestic Duck – which is largely breed for food, show, or pets. The Mallard is the duck you find down at the local pond. They are very adaptable to the urban environment, as well as the rural environment. Not only found in Oregon, they are very prevalently throughout temperate and subtropical America, Europe and North Africa. They’ve been introduced to some negative effect in Australia and New Zealand.

It’s fun to go do the local pond and watch these ducks, but they can be very mean animals to each other as well. Sometime targeting specific animals in the group and pecking at it until exhaustion. Most times the ordeal ending with the death of the targeted duck. I’ve witnessed this behavior several times at the pond in my local park. It’s a very aggressive and difficult thing to watch.

On a lighter note, when mating season comes along, the males will pair up with their chosen female and will only be together with that female until the mating is complete. They then separate with the female fending for herself during nesting. The males will even many times start looking for a second or third female to mate with. The female will usually give birth to her brood in the early Spring. They will spend the Spring and Summer teaching and learning.

I hope you like this today’s post? More information about Ducks can be found via Wikipedia. Vote above, or leave a comment/like below. Thanks for stopping by.

Peace

~V