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Posts tagged “forest

Three Moods of the Trillium Flower


Trillium flowers are blooming. This poor flower is almost extinct in some places. It’s so beautiful people can’t resist the temptation to pick it and take it home.

First off, it won’t last! Second, Don’t! In some places it’s illegal!

But, if you pick this flower it won’t get the opportunity to collect it’s all important energy that enables it bloom next year. This flower depends on it’s above ground parts to collect the energy from the Sun and send it down to the root underground for storage. The longer it has the opportunity to do that the more energy it has forĀ  continued blooms. So, take pictures all you want, but leave it where you find it. Don’t fulfill that temptation.

Peace

~V

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Cleopatra – Forest Feline


I visited Tryon Creek State Park yesterday in SW Portland yesterday and was afforded the opportunity to photograph new Spring growth in the forest. Those images will be forthcoming in future posts here. While out there walking around, I came across this little feline, with her human, out for a walk also, her name is Cleopatra and she reminded me of my awesome cat whom I lived with for 16 years. See my memorial tributes posted on this blog a year and a half ago. When Sinatra was younger he used to go for walks with me in the forest. I loved it. That forest was in my backyard, so it wasn’t difficult to get out. As far as I knew Sinatra never walked out in the forest by himself, but whenever I would go he loved to follow. And Cleopatra kind of looks just like Sinatra did. Such a cute cat, I was glad I got a chance to capture the moment.

I’m trying to create more posts here on my blog. I’ve been busy of late getting up to speed with a new photography job. Things are getting back to normal now, so hopefully you’ll get to see more posts here. Don’t give up on my.

Peace

~V


Clackamas River


Okay, so I was supposed to post this series of images last Summer, soon after I posted my Washougal River post from last year. But I got sidetracked and to be honest I didn’t think these images that I found out on the Clackamas River weren’t as spectacular? But I’ve decided to post anyway, since I haven’t posted at all this month, I wanted to get something out there.

The Clackamas River feeds into the Willamette River in Oregon City, after traversing out of the Cascade foothills Southeast of Portland, OR. It’s a beautiful river, but was probably once even more grand before Portland General Electric came in and built dams to provide power to the growing city to the North. The valley hasn’t been logged very much recently as compared to along Highway 26 out to the coast. It was logged long ago, and the second growth forest is coming in nicely. Hopefully they won’t log again for a long time to come.

I also wanted to say that I updated my last Feature Artist post featuring some commentary about the pieces I posted images of from the artist himself, Jan Shield. Check out the link and some great fine art.

Peace

~V


Opal Creek Wilderness


The Opal Creek Wilderness is only about an hour’s ride heading East out of Salem, OR. This is a nice size wilderness area lying within the Willamette National Forest, just North of Detroit Lake. This area used to be a little mining village & features the remnants of a mill from when logging was being planned for the area. They started logging, set up buildings and other structures before determining that it isn’t economically feasible to log the area. After a 20 year long struggle to protect the area this largest uncut watershed in Oregon finally became protected area in 1996 when then Senator Mark Hatfield introduced, and achieved success in passage of, federal protection of the Opal Creek area.

Now a days, due to it’s convenient location, it’s a heavily used area for recreation and outdoor activities. In fact, that was one of my complaints about the day was the number of folks we saw while visiting. I like to get out to areas where I can see no one, or very few other visitors. Also, thanks to our dry season, the forested area around the road we traveled was real dusty from heavy vehicle traffic. Still, one can reserve cabins or find plenty of places to camp while visiting. Eight trails bring 50 waterfalls to you by traveling over 36 miles of outdoor fun to a day out in the wilderness.

Here are some images from my trek last Sunday. It was a great day and I’m totally looking to visiting and taking more images again soon.

You can purchase prints by visiting my ViewBug profile.

And, as always, you can find me on Facebook.

Peace, and have a great weekend.

~V